Krista Fuller’s The Outside Inn

We always love to hear how former clients are doing. Today a lovely email arrived from Krista Fuller about the publication of her book The Outsider’s Inn . The book deals with some heavy stuff, but it’s handled with such a deft touch. We could probably all do with a little more conscious living …

A sample of some of the testimonials coming in below. With the best one last 🙂

“Krista’s treatment of this sensitive subject matter is inspired. To complement her exhaustive research, she writes with great wit and a deep compassion that is informed by her own trials and tribulations, giving her an empathy and understanding for the subject that is hard to equal.”

Dr George Blair-West: Psychiatrist, Author of The Way of The Quest

“Krista is a brave and insightful writer who draws on her own personal story that makes her book a powerful resource for her reader. I believe her heartfelt words will help many individuals, couples, families and those working in the field of emotional health and wellbeing look at these complex life issues from a refreshingly new perspective. Congratulations Krista, your book is essential reading for anyone interested in understanding the wonderful resilience of the human spirit, even in the most seemingly dire of consequences.”

Cynthia Morton: Author, Australian of the Year, Prime Minister’s Award for Excellence, Pride of Australia Medal

“Hi Krista. I’m 14 and I was given your book as a random act of kindness. The Outsider’s Inn has helped me understand the tougher subjects of today’s society. I would like to thank you for the helpful guide your book has been. You seem like a wonderful and very inspiring woman. An amazing book – everyone should read this, especially teens.”

Student: Newcastle, New South Wales

 

Stella Bella: Carrie Tiffany

Congratulations to the inaugural winner of the Stella Prize: Carrie Tiffany.

In a moving (and fitting) gesture, Carrie shared part of her prize with the other shortlisted writers.  What a woman.

You can listen to Carrie’s gracious acceptance speech here.

Ravin’ about the Raven: What the Raven Saw

Congratulations this month to Samantha-Ellen Bound. Her book, What the Raven Saw, has been published by Woolshed Press. It is a fabulous old-fashioned adventure story, full of laughter and tears, and one to be enjoyed as much by adults as children.

Sam’s story, ‘Jim’, was one of the winners of the 2010 Perilous Adventures short story competition – so it’s lovely to see Sam’s writing journey really taking flight. I had the pleasure of reading draft chapters from What the Raven Saw, and the grumpy but lovable Raven is a character I have never forgotten – and knew I would see in print. Destined to be a classic!!

Rupetta

Nike’s wonderful novel, Rupetta, about a partly mechanical woman who lives four hundred years, hits the stands next month, published by Tartarus Press, in the UK.

If you don’t know Tartarus, they publish beautifully bound books in the specualtive fiction genre. (Angela Slatter’s short story collection, Sourdough, is also on their list). Get your hands on a hard copy of Rupetta if you can.

The book is beautifully written – sentences to die for – and the story rich with wisdom, historical texture, and gorgeous detail. I have to warn you, though; it’s a little heartbreaking.

Rupetta will be launched at the The Golden Fleece in York, on 9 February, if you are mobile or in the neighbourhood.

You can read an extract here:

And some background about the novel from nike’s website here:

 

 

 

Felicity Castagna

Another Olvar Wood alumni is enjoying enormous success with the publication of her collection of short fiction, Small Indiscretions: stories of travelling in Asia.

A traveller becomes a Monroe impersonator in the casinos of Macau. An obsessive son of Australians living in Jakarta confronts his strange rituals. A young woman is trapped in the boredom of her father’s ministry in exotic Borneo. A daughter defies her mother and travels to Bali. Castagna’s twenty stories range across countries: including Indonesia, Cambodia, Vietnam, Laos and China, deftly exploring the relationships of parents and children, lovers and enemies, the transient and the resident. In the spirit of Rattawatt Lapacharoensap’s Sightseeing, Castagna’s fiction powerfully captures the landscapes and cultures of Asia and the intriguing interactions of Westerners with it.